Essay on Mahatma Gandhi

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Published on : October 2, 2020 Updated on : December 4, 2020 Essay on Mahatma Gandhi
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Byggari Harshil

RANK 1, AC3610

 

It all began with the idea of Mahatma Gandhi to free India from the control of the British, in 1930, Mahatma Gandhi proposed a non-violence march to protest the British Salt Tax. To understand why the British salt tax was so oppressive to the Indian people, it helps to know a bit about the subcontinent’s climate and culture. India’s hot weather promotes sweating, which drains the human body of its salt supply. Since Indians don’t eat much meat – a natural source of salt – they relied on supplementary salt to maintain a healthy amount in the body. Taxing the mineral that Indian people relied on for survival was just one way that the British government kept Indians under its thumb. As salt is necessary in everyone’s daily diet, everyone in India was affected and upon realizing the scheme of the British, the salt march was set in motion. Before embarking on a 240 miles march from Sabarmati to Dandi to protest the salt tax, Gandhi sent a letter to the Lord Irwin, the viceroy of India, forewarning their plans of civil disobedience: “If my letter makes no appeal to your heart, on the eleventh day of this month I shall proceed with such co-workers of the Ashram as I can take, to disregard the provisions of the Salt Laws. I regard this tax to be the most iniquitous of all from the poor man’s standpoint. As the Independence movement is essentially for the poorest in the land, the beginning will be made with this evil.”

(Gandhi) Acknowledged of this action, the viceroy could have arrested him easily but by doing so could spark an intense backlash so he only replied: “[Gandhi was] contemplating a course of action which is clearly bound to involve violation of the law and danger to the public peace.” As promised, on March 12, 1930, Gandhi and 78 male satyagrahis (activists of truth and resolution) started marching toward the Arabian Sea. It has been told that along his way, the roads were watered, and fresh flowers and green leaves strewn on the path; and as the satyagrahis walked, they did so to the tune of one of Gandhi’s favorite bhajans, Raghupati Raghava Raja Ram, sung by the great Hindustani vocalist, Pandit Paluskar. Each village he passed by, he convinced government officials to resign in protest and to encourage people to pledge nonviolence, therefore, more and more men joined the march. On April 5, 1930, after a 24 day-long journey, Gandhi and his followers reached the coast, he collected a chunk of salt and immediately broke the law. No sooner had Gandhi violated the law than everyone started following him, picking up salt off the coast. A month after Gandhi completed his march he was arrested for breaking the law and soon after India’s prisons were full with 60.000 others practicing this simple act of civil disobedience.The government, represented by Lord Edward Irwin, decided to negotiate with Gandhi.

The Gandhi-Irwin Pact was signed in March 1931. The agreement between Gandhi and Irwin was signed on March 5, 1931. Following are the salient points of this agreement: The Congress would discontinue the Civil Disobedience Movement. The Congress would participate in the Round Table Conference. The Government would withdraw all ordinances issued to curb the Congress. The Government would withdraw all prosecutions relating to offenses not involving violence. The Government would release all persons undergoing sentences of imprisonment for their activities in the civil disobedience movement. The pact shows that the British Government was anxious to bring the Congress to the conference table. The British Government agreed to free all political prisoners, in return for the discontinuation of the civil disobedience movement. Also as a result of the pact, Gandhi was invited to attend the Round Table Conference in London as the sole representative of the Indian National Congress. Gandhi was sent by the Congress as its sole representative, but the negotiations proved to be disappointing, for the most part that various other Indian communities had been encouraged by the British to send a representative and make the claim that they were not prepared to live in an India under the domination of the Congress.

Furthermore, it focused on the Indian princes and Indian minorities rather than on a transfer of power. Yet never before had the British consented to negotiate directly with the Congress, and Gandhi met Irwin as his equal. In this respect, the man who most loathed Gandhi, Winston Churchill, understood the level of Gandhi’s achievement when he stated it “alarming and also nauseating to see Mr. Gandhi, a seditious Middle Temple lawyer, now posing as a fakir of a type well known in the East, striding half-naked up the steps of the viceregal palace, while he is still organizing and conducting a defiant campaign of civil disobedience, to parley on equal terms with the representative of the King-Emperor.” The result was unexpected as Gandhi was again arrested, and the government tried and failed to negate his influence by completely isolating him from his followers

 

Somesh Vatsya

RANK 2, AC2362

 

Indian Independence by -Mahatma Gandhi- Mahatma Gandhi Mahatma Gandhi was born on October 2 1869 at Porbandar, Gujarat. His father was Karamchanda Gandhi and mother was Putlibai. His father was the Chief minister [Diwan] of Porbandar. He gained his primary education in the same city. At the age of 9 he went to Rajkot and joined Alfred High School. He completed his school in 1882. He got married in the age of 13 with Kastubra Gandhi. He went to London and joined University of London in 1888. He completed his law graduation in 1897. Struggle of Mahatma Gandhi While practicing law at South Africa, a person called him to periled a case. While going at that place he needed to get a train. He got a ticket of first class. While going a white man (collector) told him to go in the van as he was an Indian. Gandhiji refused to go as he had first class ticket. The train stopped in a station known as Pietermaritzburg station. Contribution of Mahatma Gandhi In 1915, Mahatma Gandhi returned to India from South Africa.When he came to know the plight of Indians he began the freedom struggle. The freedom movements he started were based on non-violence and satyagraha.

He started many movements like:- Neel satyagraha, Non-Cooperation Movement, Civil-Disobedience Movement, Salt march and many more….. Neel satyagraha at Champaran- Gandhiji has already tested satyagraha as a tool against the discrimination of black people in South Africa. When he came to know about status of farmers at Champaran in Bihar, who were forced to farm Indigo(Neel),Gandhiji extended his support to those farmers by involving himself as a leader on 15nth April 1917. This movement was successfully ended as British government agreed to stop Indigo farming. Non-Cooperation Movement: Non-Cooperation Movement was started on 1920 with a request to Indians to not cooperate with British Government and to reject British goods by stopping children to going to British school or college, service men should not continue there service to British ruler offices. It’s aim was to achieve swarj or self-rule in a legal and peaceful way. In 1922, the movement took a violent turn in Chauri Chaura, a village in UttarPradesh. A group of angry protesters set a police station on fire. 22 Police Officers lost their lives in that incident. This hurt Gandhiji”s sentiments and he called off the movement. Civil disobedience movement: In 1929, Jawaharlal Nehru presided over the Indian National Congress. It’s aim was to achieve Purna Swaraj or complete freedom. It encouraged Gandhiji to lead Civil Disobedience Movement. The objective of this movement was to disobey any law issued by government and demand for Purna Swaraj. Dandi March: To begin the movement, Gandhiji decided to break Salt law. The British had made this law to prevent Indians from making salt. On 12 March 1930, Gandhiji along with his followers set off from the Sabarmati Ashram to coastal village of Dandi. Gandhiji broke the law by picking up handful of salt from the beach. Strength and Weakness of Gandhiji Gandhi was repeatedly imprisoned by the British and resorted to hunger strikes as part of his civil disobedience. His final imprisonment came in 1942-44, after he had demanded total withdrawal of the British (the “Quit India” movement) during World War II.

While some in India viewed Gandhi as not protesting against violence directed against the British, Gandhi spent much time in fasting, grieving over partition of the country, and trying to quell violence. As well as struggling for political independence, Gandhi fought to improve the status of the lowest classes of society, the casteless untouchables. He was a believer in manual labor and simple living; he spun the thread and wove the cloth for his own garments and insisted that his followers do so, too. He disagreed with those who wanted India to become an industrial country. Gandhi was also tireless in his attempts to forge closer bonds between the Hindu majority and Muslims and other minorities. His greatest failure, in fact, was his inability to dissuade India Muslims from creating a separate state, Pakistan. When independence finally arrived in 1947, after negotiations in which he was a principal participant, Gandhi opposed the partition of the subcontinent with great intensity. Ironically, he was assassinated in Delhi on 30 January 1948, by a Hindu fanatic who thought his anti-partition sentiment was both pro-Muslim and pro-Pakistan. Thoughts of Gandhiji There were many thoughts of Gandhiji…some of them are given here:- An eye for an eye only ends up making the whole world blind. You should be the change that you want to see in the world. Earth provides enough to satisfy every man’s needs, but not every man’s greed. The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. I suppose leadership at one time meant muscles; but today it means getting along with people. Freedom is not worth having if it does not include the freedom to make mistakes. The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be measured by the way in which its animals are treated. Nobody can hurt me without my permission. You can’t shake hands with a clenched fist. The more efficient a force is, the more silent and the more subtle it is. The greatness of humanity is not in being human, but in being humane. Sacrifice that causes pain is no sacrifice at all. True sacrifice is joy – giving and uplifting.

 

Anirudh Goud

RANK 3, AD3449

 

MAHATMA GANDHI Mohandas Karamchand Gandhiji Born on 2nd October 1869 and raised in a Hindu family in coastal Gujarat, western India, Gandhi trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, and was called to the bar at age 22 in June 1891. After two uncertain years in India, where he was unable to start a successful law practice, he moved to South Africa in 1893 to represent an Indian merchant in a lawsuit. He went on to stay for 21 years. It was in South Africa that Gandhi raised a family, and first employed nonviolent resistance in a campaign for civil rights. In 1915, aged 45, he returned to India. He set about organizing peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women’s rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, and above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule. Three years in London Student of law Gandhi came from a poor family, and he had dropped out of the cheapest college he could afford, Mavji Dave Joshiji, a Brahmin priest and family friend, advised Gandhi and his family that he should consider law studies in London. In July 1888, his wife Kasturba gave birth to their first surviving son, Harilal. His mother was not comfortable about Gandhi leaving his wife and family, and going so far from home. Gandhi’s uncle Tulsidas also tried to dissuade his nephew. Gandhi wanted to go. To persuade his wife and mother, Gandhi made a vow in front of his mother that he would abstain from meat, alcohol and women. Gandhi’s brother Laxmidas, who was already a lawyer, cheered Gandhi’s London studies plan and offered to support him. Putlibai gave Gandhi her permission and blessing. On 10 August 1888, Gandhi aged 18, left Porbandar for Mumbai, then known as Bombay. Upon arrival, he stayed with the local Modh Bania community whose elders warned him that England would tempt him to compromise his religion, and eat and drink in Western ways. Despite Gandhi informing them of his promise to his mother and her blessings, he was excommunicated from his caste. Gandhi ignored this, and on 4 September, he sailed from Bombay to London, with his brother seeing him off. Gandhi attended University College, London which is a constituent college of University of London.

Struggle for Indian independence (1915–1947) Gandhi joined the Indian National Congress and was introduced to Indian issues, politics and the Indian people primarily by Gokhale. Gokhale was a key leader of the Congress Party best known for his restraint and moderation, and his insistence on working inside the system. Gandhi took leadership of the Congress in 1920 and began escalating demands until on 26 January 1930 the Indian National Congress declared the independence of India. The British did not recognize the declaration but negotiations ensued, with the Congress taking a role in provincial government in the late 1930s. Gandhi and the Congress withdrew their support of the Raj when the Viceroy declared war on Germany in September 1939 without consultation. Tensions escalated until Gandhi demanded immediate independence in 1942 and the British responded by imprisoning him and tens of thousands of Congress leaders. Meanwhile, the Muslim League did co-operate with Britain and moved, against Gandhi’s strong opposition, to demands for a totally separate Muslim state of Pakistan. In August 1947 the British partitioned the land with India and Pakistan each achieving independence on terms that Gandhi disapproved.

Salt Satyagraha (Salt March) After his early release from prison for political crimes in 1924, over the second half of the 1920s, Gandhi continued to pursue swaraj. Gandhi opposed the partition of the Indian subcontinent along religious lines. The Indian National Congress and Gandhi called for the British to Quit India. However, the Muslim League demanded “Divide and Quit India”. Gandhi suggested an agreement which required the Congress and the Muslim League to co-operate and attain independence under a provisional government, thereafter, the question of partition could be resolved by a plebiscite in the districts with a Muslim majority. Jinnah rejected Gandhi’s proposal and called for Direct Action Day, on 16 August 1946, to press Muslims to publicly gather in cities and support his proposal for the partition of the Indian subcontinent into a Muslim state and non-Muslim state. Huseyn Shaheed Suhrawardy, the Muslim League Chief Minister of Bengal – now Bangladesh and West Bengal, gave Calcutta’s police special holiday to celebrate the Direct Action Day. The Direct Action Day triggered a mass murder of Calcutta Hindus and the torching of their property, and holidaying police were missing to contain or stop the conflict. The British government did not order its army to move in to contain the violence. The violence on Direct Action Day led to retaliatory violence against Muslims across India. Thousands of Hindus and Muslims were murdered, and tens of thousands were injured in the cycle of violence in the days that followed. Gandhi visited the most riot-prone areas to appeal a stop to the massacres. Death Main article: Assassination of Mahatma Gandhi At 5:17 pm on 30 January 1948, Gandhi was with his grandnieces in the garden of Birla House (now Gandhi Smriti), on his way to address a prayer meeting, when Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, fired three bullets into his chest from a pistol at close range. According to some accounts, Gandhi died instantly. In other accounts, such as one prepared by an eyewitness journalist, Gandhi was carried into the Birla House, into a bedroom. There he died about 30 minutes later as one of Gandhi’s family members read verses from Hindu scriptures.

Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru addressed his countrymen over the All-India Radio saying: Friends and comrades, the light has gone out of our lives, and there is darkness everywhere, and I do not quite know what to tell you or how to say it. Our beloved leader, Bapu as we called him, the father of the nation, is no more. Perhaps I am wrong to say that; nevertheless, we will not see him again, as we have seen him for these many years, we will not run to him for advice or seek solace from him, and that is a terrible blow, not only for me, but for millions and millions in this country. Jai Swaminarayan, thank you for giving this opportunity S ANIRUDH MID-AD3449 VIII CLASS POOL-C

 

 

Revanth Mahanthi

RANK 4, AC8029

 

Essay on Mahatma Gandhi – Mahatma Gandhi was a great patriotic Indian, if not the greatest. He was a man of an unbelievably great personality. He certainly does not need anyone like me praising him. Furthermore, his efforts for Indian independence are unparalleled. Most noteworthy, there would have been a significant delay in independence without him. Consequently, the British because of his pressure left India in 1947. In this essay on Mahatma Gandhi, we will see his contribution and legacy. Essay on Mahatma Gandhi Contributions of Mahatma Gandhi First of all, Mahatma Gandhi was a notable public figure.

His role in social and political reform was instrumental. Above all, he rid the society of these social evils. Hence, many oppressed people felt great relief because of his efforts. Gandhi became a famous international figure because of these efforts. Furthermore, he became the topic of discussion in many international media outlets. Mahatma Gandhi made significant contributions to environmental sustainability. Most noteworthy, he said that each person should consume according to his needs. The main question that he raised was “How much should a person consume?”. Gandhi certainly put forward this question. Furthermore, this model of sustainability by Gandhi holds huge relevance in current India. This is because currently, India has a very high population. There has been the promotion of renewable energy and small-scale irrigation systems.

This was due to Gandhiji’s campaigns against excessive industrial development. Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence is probably his most important contribution. This philosophy of non-violence is known as Ahimsa. Most noteworthy, Gandhiji’s aim was to seek independence without violence. He decided to quit the Non-cooperation movement after the Chauri-Chaura incident. This was due to the violence at the Chauri Chaura incident. Consequently, many became upset at this decision. However, Gandhi was relentless in his philosophy of Ahimsa. Secularism is yet another contribution of Gandhi. His belief was that no religion should have a monopoly on the truth. Mahatma Gandhi certainly encouraged friendship between different religious.

 

Harshit Anupkumar Baheti

RANK 5, AC7681

 

Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated in India as a national festival on 2nd October, every year. This day is celebrated to remember the birth of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2nd October 1869-30th January 1948). It is one of the three National holidays, Such as Independence Day and Republic day, Which are Celebrated in India. Mahatma Gandhi, wo has given the title of “Father of Nation ” or ” Rashtrapita”, is also called by the name “Bapu”.

He was a great follower of peace (Satya) and non-violence (Ahimsa). He is regarded as the leader of the freedom struggle for India and is highly appreciated for his simplicity and principle follower. Therefore, on his birthday, 2nd Oct, Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated as a National Holiday and people contribute their time memorizing his teachings and principles. Mahatma Gandhi had a family of merchant class. At 24 Years of age, mahatma Gandhi went to south Africa to pursue law and he came Back to India in 1915. After his return to India, he became a member of the Indian National congress. He is not only worked for India’ s Independence he also fought for various kinds of social evils like untouchability, casteism, female subjugation, etc. At this point of time for his hard work, he became the president of the congress. He also helped for so many poor and needy.

Bapu was born at the time when Britishers were ruling in India. He has played the most significant role in the struggle of Indian independence. His love for the nation, supreme dedication for our country’s independence and kindness to non-Violence all over the world, declared by the United Nations General Assembly on the 15th of June 2007. The purpose is to spread Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy, his teachings of non-violence and peace all over the world. In some of the places, Gandhi’s birthday is celebrated with physical activities based on some theme, to grow public awareness worldwide . Soonly we will update Gandhi Jayanti Essay in Tamil, Hindi, Gujarati, Bengali. Mahatma Gandhi was a great patriotic Indian, if not the greatest. He was a man of an unbelievably great personality. He certainly does not need anyone like me praising him. Furthermore, his efforts for Indian independence are unparalleled. Most noteworthy, there would have been a significant delay in independence without him. Consequently, the British because of his pressure left India in 1947. In this essay on Mahatma Gandhi, we will see his contribution and legacy. First of all, Mahatma Gandhi was a notable public figure.

His role in social and political reform was instrumental. Above all, he rid the society of these social evils. Hence, many oppressed people felt great relief because of his efforts. Gandhi became a famous international figure because of these efforts. Furthermore, he became the topic of discussion in many international media outlets. Mahatma Gandhi made significant contributions to environmental sustainability. Most noteworthy, he said that each person should consume according to his needs. Two leaders influenced by Mahatma Gandhi are Martin Luther King Jr and Nelson Mandela.

 

Polisetti Dhireesh Sai

RANK 6, AB7360

 

Gandhi Jayanti is an event celebrated in India to mark the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. It is celebrated annually on 2 October, and it is one of the three national holidays of India. 2 October will be celebrated as the International Day of Non-Violence. He follows 3 main principles we these are NON VIOLENCE , TRUTH , PEACE. Mahatma Gandhi was born in Porbandar , Gujarat, India .His father name is Karamchand Gandhi and mother name is Putlibai Gandhi . Full name of Gandhi Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi , his date of birth is 2nd Oct 1893 , date of death 30 January 1948. He is named with many names Mahatma Gandhi, Bapu ji, Gandhi ji, M. K. Gandhi. The Salt March, also known as the Salt Satyagraha, Dandi March and the Dandi Satyagraha, was an act of nonviolent civil disobedience in colonial India led by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. The 24-day march lasted from 12 March 1930 to 6 April 1930 as a direct action campaign of tax resistance and nonviolent protest against the British salt monopoly. Another reason for this march was that the Civil Disobedience Movement needed a strong inauguration that would inspire more people to follow Gandhi’s example. Mahatma Gandhi started this march with 79 of his trusted volunteers. Walking ten miles a day for 24 days, the march spanned over 240 miles (384 km), from Sabarmati Ashram to Dandi, which was called Navsari at that time (now in the state of Gujarat). Growing numbers of Indians joined them along the way. When Gandhi broke the salt laws at 6:30 am on 6 April 1930.After making the salt by evaporation at Dandi, Gandhi continued southward along the coast, making salt and addressing meetings on the way.

The Congress Party planned to stage a satyagraha at the Dharasana Salt Works, 25 miles south of Dandi. However, Gandhi was arrested on the midnight of 4–5 May 1930, just days before the planned action at Dharasana.Gandhi had a long-standing commitment to nonviolent civil disobedience, which he termed satyagraha, as the basis for achieving Indian sovereignty and self-rule. Referring to the relationship between satyagraha and Purna Swaraj, Gandhi saw “an inviolable connection between the means and the end as there is between the seed and the tree”. He wrote, “If the means employed are impure, the change will not be in the direction of progress but very likely in the opposite. Only a change brought about in our political condition by pure means can lead to real progress .”The Quit India Movement (translated into several Indian languages as the Leave India Movement), also known as the August Movement, was a movement launched at the Bombay session of the All-India Congress Committee by Mahatma Gandhi on 8 August 1942, during World War II, demanding an end to British rule in India.

After the failure of the Cripps Mission to secure Indian support for the British war effort, Gandhi made a call to Do or Die in his Quit India speech delivered in Bombay on 8 August 1942 at the Gowalia Tank Maidan. The All-India Congress Committee launched a mass protest demanding what Gandhi called “An Orderly British Withdrawal” from India. Even though it was at war, the British were prepared to act. Almost the entire leadership of the Indian National Congress was imprisoned without trial within hours of Gandhi’s speech. Most spent the rest of the war in prison and out of contact with the masses. The British had the support of the Viceroy’s Council (which had a majority of Indians), of the All India Muslim League, the princely states, the Indian Imperial Police, the British Indian Army, the Hindu Mahasabha and the Indian Civil Service. Many Indian businessmen profiting from heavy wartime spending did not support the Quit India Movement. Many students paid more attention to Subhas Chandra Bose, who was in exile and supporting the Axis Powers. The only outside support came from the Americans, as President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressured Prime Minister Winston Churchill to give in to some of the Indian demands.

The Quit India campaign was effectively crushed. The British refused to grant immediate independence, saying it could happen only after the war had ended. Gandhi came from a poor family, and he had dropped out of the cheapest college he could afford.Mavji Dave Joshiji, a Brahmin priest and family friend, advised Gandhi and his family that he should consider law studies in London.In July 1888, his wife Kasturba gave birth to their first surviving son, Harilal. His mother was not comfortable about Gandhi leaving his wife and family, and going so far from home. Gandhi’s uncle Tulsidas also tried to dissuade his nephew. Gandhi wanted to go. To persuade his wife and mother, Gandhi made a vow in front of his mother that he would abstain from meat, alcohol and women. Gandhi’s brother Laxmidas, who was already a lawyer, cheered Gandhi’s London studies plan and offered to support him. Putlibai gave Gandhi her permission and blessing. On 10 August 1888, Gandhi aged 18, left Porbandar for Mumbai, then known as Bombay. Upon arrival, he stayed with the local Modh Bania community whose elders warned him that England would tempt him to compromise his religion, and eat and drink in Western ways. Despite Gandhi informing them of his promise to his mother and her blessings, he was excommunicated from his caste. Gandhi ignored this, and on 4 September, he sailed from Bombay to London, with his brother seeing him off. Gandhi attended University College, London which is a constituent college of University of London. Gandhi, at age 22, was called to the bar in June 1891 and then left London for India, where he learned that his mother had died while he was in London and that his family had kept the news from him. His attempts at establishing a law practice in Bombay failed because he was psychologically unable to cross-examine witnesses. He returned to Rajkot to make a modest living drafting petitions for litigants, but he was forced to stop when he ran afoul of a British officer Sam Sunny. Gandhi joined the Indian National Congress and was introduced to Indian issues, politics and the Indian people primarily by Gokhale. Gokhale was a key leader of the Congress Party best known for his restraint and moderation, and his insistence on working inside the system. Gandhi took Gokhale’s liberal approach based on British Whiggish traditions and transformed it to make it look Indian. In April 1918, during the latter part of World War I, the Viceroy invited Gandhi to a War Conference in Delhi. Gandhi agreed to actively recruit Indians for the war effort.

In contrast to the Zulu War of 1906 and the outbreak of World War I in 1914, when he recruited volunteers for the Ambulance Corps, this time Gandhi attempted to recruit combatants. In a June 1918 leaflet entitled “Appeal for Enlistment”, Gandhi wrote “To bring about such a state of things we should have the ability to defend ourselves, that is, the ability to bear arms and to use them… If we want to learn the use of arms with the greatest possible despatch, it is our duty to enlist ourselves in the army.” He did, however, stipulate in a letter to the Viceroy’s private secretary that he “personally will not kill or injure anybody, friend or foe.” In 1919, following World War I, Gandhi (aged 49) sought political co-operation from Muslims in his fight against British imperialism by supporting the Ottoman Empire that had been defeated in the World War. Before this initiative of Gandhi, communal disputes and religious riots between Hindus and Muslims were common in British India, such as the riots of 1917–18. Gandhi had already supported the British crown with resources and by recruiting Indian soldiers to fight the war in Europe on the British side. This effort of Gandhi was in part motivated by the British promise to reciprocate the help with swaraj (self-government) to Indians after the end of World War I

 

Yug Limbani

RANK 7, AD2706

 

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi ( 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian lawyer, anti-colonial nationalist, and political ethicist, who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India’s independence from British rule, and in turn inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahātmā ,first applied to him in 1914 in South Africa, is now used throughout the world. His contributions to the formation of Modern India also gave him the title – “Father of the Nation”. Born and raised in a Hindu family in coastal Gujarat, western India, Gandhi trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, and was called to the bar at age 22 in June 1891. After two uncertain years in India, where he was unable to start a successful law practice, he moved to South Africa in 1893 to represent an Indian merchant in a lawsuit.

He went on to stay for 21 years. It was in South Africa that Gandhi raised a family, and first employed nonviolent resistance in a campaign for civil rights. In 1915, aged 45, he returned to India. He set about organizing peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women’s rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, and above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule. The same year Gandhi adopted the Indian loincloth, or short dhoti and, in the winter, a shawl, both woven with yarn hand-spun on a traditional Indian spinning wheel, or charkha, as a mark of identification with India’s rural poor. Thereafter, he lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community, ate simple vegetarian food, and undertook long fasts as a means of self-purification and political protest. Bringing anti-colonial nationalism to the common Indians, Gandhi led them in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in both South Africa and India. Gandhi’s vision of an independent India based on religious pluralism was challenged in the early 1940s by a new Muslim nationalism which was demanding a separate Muslim homeland carved out of India. In August 1947, Britain granted independence, but the British Indian Empire was partitioned into two dominions, a Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan.

As many displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs made their way to their new lands, religious violence broke out, especially in the Punjab and Bengal. Eschewing the official celebration of independence in Delhi, Gandhi visited the affected areas, attempting to provide solace. In the months following, he undertook several fasts unto death to stop religious violence. The last of these, undertaken on 12 January 1948 when he was 78, also had the indirect goal of pressuring India to pay out some cash assets owed to Pakistan. Some Indians thought Gandhi was too accommodating. Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest. Gandhi’s birthday, 2 October, is commemorated in India as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence. Gandhi is commonly considered the Father of the Nation in India, and was commonly called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for father, papa).

 

C.Sai Saathvik Reddy

RANK 8, AC3079

 

Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated on October 2nd every year to mark the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. It is observed across all the states of India as a national wide official holiday declared by the central government. Furthermore, Gandhi Jayanti is one of the three national holidays of India. First of all, Gandhi Jayanti is nothing but a grand commemoration of Mahatma Gandhi. Gandhi Jayanti is certainly one of the national holidays where everyone pays their respect to this legend. This patriotic occasion’s celebration is held in every State and Union Territory of the subcontinent of India. Mohandas Gandhi’s reputation as the Indian spiritual and political leader who coordinated and led a successful national struggle for independence against the imperial British rule. He also has the honor of the title of “father of the nation”.

The legend of Mahatma Gandhi had a family of the merchant class. This confident man went to South Africa at 24 years of age. He went there to pursue law. returned to India from South Africa in 1915, took control, and radically transformed the Indian nationalist movement that eventually wore down the British government led to Indian Independence. During the freedom struggle, Mahatma Gandhiji started many big movements against the British, following the path of truth and non-violence. His peacefully organized movements not only weakened the foundations of the British government in India but also forced him to leave India. In the year 1917, when the British were exploiting the farmers of Champaran under their oppressive policies, some farmers were not able to pay much tax. In the year 1918, due to the severe floods in Kheda of Gujarat, the farmers were unable to pay a heavy tax to the British. Gandhiji was deeply saddened by the oppressive policies of the British and the innocent people killed in the Jallianwala Bagh massacre. Mahatma Gandhi launched this movement against the oppressive policies of the British government. He traveled to violate the salt law of the British government. Mahatma Gandhi started the “Quit India Movement” against British rule in the year 1942 to drive the British out of India. A few years after this movement, India was free from the British rulers. In this way, the movements launched by Mahatma Gandhi on the path of truth and non-violence played an important role in liberating slave India and left a deep impact in everyone’s life He believed in the ‘make in India’ concept long ago and asked his fellow people to wear weaved clothes which were made by handwheel called chakras. He only wore khadi and discarded any foreign materials and goods. He was not only a freedom fighter but also a social reformer. He removed social prejudice problems such as Untouchability, Casteism, and female prejudice He named the untouchables as Harijans or children of God.

Furthermore, he also made significant efforts to help the poor and needy. Mahatma Gandhi had a great dislike for the British rule in India. However, he was not in favor of the path of violence. Gandhi strictly was a believer in the philosophy of Ahimsa (non-violence). Consequently, the man opposed British rule in a peaceful manner. Furthermore, Gandhi’s peaceful protests and movements were highly effective. His methods and plans were very efficient. Due to his incredible effectiveness, Gandhiji became an inspiration for other World leaders. Once again, Gandhi was bestowed with another title of Mahatma. The meaning of the word Mahatma is a great soul. His birthday was made into a day of magnificent remembrance and celebration. Mahatma Gandhi was a great leader so that he has influenced several international leaders across the globe. Many leaders got so much inspiration from the struggle of Mahatma Gandhi some leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr., James Lawson, and James Beve. Nelson Mandela was also influenced by the freedom struggle of Gandhi Ji. The UN(United Nations) has greatly honored Gandhi Ji that’s why they announced that they celebrate 2 October as an International Day of Non-violence. Mahatma Gandhi received so many awards as the greatest political icon, father of the nation, many more. Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated wholeheartedly all over the country in schools, colleges, and universities to mark his teachings.

Prayer services and tributes take place on the occasion of Gandhi Jayanti. These prayer services and tributes take place all over the country. Furthermore, various prayer meetings and commemorative ceremonies also occur on Gandhi Jayanti. These events take place in schools, colleges, government, and private institutions. Most noteworthy, people from all walks of life take part in such events. Competitions of painting, essay, etc. take place everywhere. Furthermore, there is a distribution of awards for such competitions. Students in many schools and colleges also watch documentaries and performances on Mahatma Gandhi’s life. Consequently, there is a promotion of a non-violent way of life among the youth. There are also singing events of Gandhiji’s favorite Bhajan( Hindu devotional song). Another observance is the decoration of Gandhi statues with flowers and garlands. Finally, some individuals avoid eating meat or drinking alcohol on Gandhi Jayanti. Gandhi Jayanti honors the great personality of Mahatma Gandhi. It’s an opportunity to reflect and cherish the life of this great personality. Furthermore, everyone must try to live like him on this day. Gandhi Jayanti is certainly a very patriotic day in India.

 

Saathwik Bellala

RANK 9, AD3155

 

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948) A great freedom fighter was born on October 2nd 1869 he was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi or popularly known as Mahatma (Great soul)Gandhi or bapu (father)known as father of the nation. He was born in the place of Porbandar (360575) in the state of Gujarat. Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated on 30 January 1948 in the compound of Birla House (now Gandhi Smriti), a large mansion in New Delhi. Perpetrator: Nathuram Vinayak Godse. Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi shaped our independence:7 major freedom movements initiated by Mahatma Gandhiare:- 1.

World War I Lord Chelmsford, the then Viceroy of India, invited Gandhi to Delhi at a War Conference. In order to gain the trust of the empire, Gandhi agreed to move people to enlist in the army for World War I. However, he wrote to the Viceroy and said that he “personally will not kill or injure anybody, friend or foe”. 2. Champaran The Champaran agitation in Bihar was Gandhi’s first active involvement into Indian freedom politics. The Champaran farmers were being forced to grow Indigo and were being tortured if they protested. The farmers sought Gandhi’s help and through a calculated non-violent protest, Gandhi managed to win concessions from the authority. 3. Kheda When Kheda, a village in Gujarat, was badly hit by floods, the local farmers appealed to the rulers to waive off the taxes. Here, Gandhi started a signature campaign where peasants pledged non-payment of taxes. He also arranged a social boycott of the mamlatdars and talatdars (revenue officials). In 1918, the Government relaxed the conditions of payment of revenue tax until the famine ended. 4. Khilafat Movement Gandhi’s influence on the Muslim population was remarkable. This was evident in his involvement in the Khilafat Movement. After the first World War, the Muslims feared for the safety of their Caliph or religious leader and a worldwide protest was being organised to fight against the collapsing status of the Caliph. Gandhi became a prominent spokesperson of the All India Muslim Conference and returned the medals he had received from the Empire during his Indian Ambulance Corps days in South Africa. His role in the Khilafat made him a national leader in no time. 5. Non-cooperation Movement Gandhi had realised that the British had been able to be in India only because of the co-operation they received from the Indians.

Keeping this in mind, he called for a non-cooperation movement. With the Congress’ support and his indomitable spirit, he convinced people that peaceful non-cooperation was the key to Independence. The ominous day of Jallianwala Bagh Massacre triggered the non-cooperation movement. Gandhi set the goal of Swaraj or self-governance, which since then became the motto of Indian freedom movement. 6. Salt March Also known as the Dandi Movement, Gandhi’s Salt March is considered to be a pivotal incident in the history of freedom struggle. At the Calcutta Congress of 1928, Gandhi declared that the British must grant India dominion status or the country will erupt into a revolution for complete independence. The British did not pay heed to this. As a result, on December 31, 1929, the Indian flag was unfurled in Lahore and the next January 26 was celebrated as the Indian Independence Day. Then, Gandhi started a Satyagraha campaign against the salt tax in March 1930. He marched 388 kilometres from Ahmedabad to Dandi in Gujarat to make salt. Thousands of people joined him and made it one of the biggest marches in Indian history. 7. Quit India Movement During the Second World War, Gandhi was determined to strike the British Empire with a definitive blow that would secure their exit from India. This happened when the British started recruiting Indians for the war. Gandhi protested strongly and said that the Indians cannot be involved in a war that is in favour of democratic purposes when India itself is not a free country. This argument exposed the two-faced image of the colonisers and within half a decade, they were out of this country. We are proud of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi and other freedom fighters , I am thank full to all the freedom fighters , for our peace and freedom By, AD3155_Saathwik Bellala

 

T.B.V.S Pranav

RANK 10, AC7755

 

Mahatma Gandhi Mohandas Karamchand Gandhiji was born in (2nd October 1869) and died in (30th January 1948) Gandhiji was an Indian lawyer ,anti-colonial nationalist and political ethicist who employed non-violent resistence to lead the successful campaign for India’s independence from British rule and in turn inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma first applied to him in 1914 in South Africa is now used throughout the world. His contribution to the formation of Modern India also gave him a title – “Father of Nation”. Gandhiji were born and raised in Hindu in Gujarat that is in Western India on the coastal region. Gandhiji were called to the bar in age 22 in June 1891 .After two uncertain years in India where he was unable to start a successful law practice. He moved to South Africa in 1893 to represent an Indian merchant in a lawsuit. He went on to stay for 21 years. It was in South Africa that Gandhi raised a family, and first employed nonviolent resistance in a campaign for civil rights. In 1915, aged 45, he returned to India. He set about organizing peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women’s rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, and above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule. In the same year Gandhiji adopted to Dhoti and in winter he wore shawls and both were made with woven yarn that was made with hand-spun made traditionally with spinning wheel also known as charkha as a mark of identification of rural poor. Thereafter he lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community, and only ate simple vegetarian food and undertook long fasts as a means of self-purification and political protest. Bringing anti-colonial nationalism to the common Indians, Gandhi led them in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in both South Africa and India. Gandhi’s vision of an independent India based on religious pluralism was challenged in the early 1940s by a new Muslim nationalism which was demanding a separate Muslim homeland carved out of India. In August 1947, Britain granted independence, but the British Indian Empire was partitioned into two dominions, a Hindu-majority India and Muslim-majority Pakistan. As many displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs made their way to their new lands, religious violence broke out, especially in the Punjab and Bengal. Eschewing the official celebration of independence in Delhi, Gandhi visited the affected areas, attempting to provide solace.

In the months following, he undertook several fasts unto death to stop religious violence. The last of these, undertaken on 12 January 1948 when he was 78, also had the indirect goal of pressuring India to pay out some cash assets owed to Pakistan. Some Indians thought Gandhi was too accommodating Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest. Gandhi’s birthday, 2 October, is commemorated in India as GandhiJayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence. Gandhi is commonly considered the Father of the Nation in India, and was commonly called Bapu (Gujarati endearment for father, papa). Early life and background Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 into an Gujarati Modh Bania family of the Vaishya varna in Porbandar (also known as Sudamapuri), a coastal town on the Kathiawar Peninsula and then part of the small princely state of Porbandar in the Kathiawar Agency of the Indian Empire. His father, Karamchand Uttamchand Gandhi (1822–1885), served as the diwan (chief minister) of Porbandar state. As Gandhi were poor and were not educated but Gandhi provided a good chief minister. During Gandhi’s tenure he married four times his first two wife’s died young after both giving a birth to a daughter and his third marriage was childless. In 1857 Gandhi sought his third wife’s permission to remarry that year he married Putlibai (1844-1891) who also came from Junagadh and was from Pranami Vaishnava family. Karamchand and Putlibai had three children over the ensuing decade, a son Laxmidas (c 1860-1914), a daughter (1862-1960) and another son named Karsandas (c.1866-1913). On 2 October 1869, Putlibai gave birth to her last child, Mohandas, in a dark, windowless ground-floor room of the Gandhi family residence in Porbandar city. As a child, Gandhi was described by his sister Raliat as “restless as mercury, either playing or roaming about.

One of his favourite pastimes was twisting dogs’ ears.” The Indian classics, especially the stories of Shravana and king Harishchandra, had a great impact on Gandhi in his childhood. In his autobiography, he admits that they left an indelible impression on his mind. He writes: “It haunted me and I must have acted Harishchandra to myself times without number.” Gandhi’s early self-identification with truth and love as supreme values is traceable to these epic characters. The family’s religious background was eclectic. Gandhi’s father Karamchand was Hindu and his mother Putlibai was from a Pranami Vaishnava Hindu family. Gandhi’s father was of Modh Baniya caste in the varna of Vaishya. His mother came from the medieval Krishna bhakti-based Pranami tradition, whose religious texts include the Bhagavad Gita, the Bhagavata Purana, and a collection of 14 texts with teachings that the tradition believes to include the essence of the Vedas, the Quran and the Bible. Gandhi was deeply influenced by his mother, an extremely pious lady who “would not think of taking her meals without her daily prayers… she would take the hardest vows and keep them without flinching. To keep two or three consecutive fasts was nothing to her.” HAPPY GANDHI JAYANTHI Written by T.B.V.S Pranav AC7755 CLASS 7 POOL B 7 AQUA

 

Veer Pratap Singh

RANK 11, AC5724

 

MAHATMA GANDHI JI Mohan Das Karamchandra Gandhi born in the year 1869 on the second of October In the village of Porbandar ,in Gujarat , His wife name was Kasturba Gandhi and he was having four son’s named Harilal Gandhi, Ramdas Gandhi, Manilal Gandhi, and ,Devdas Gandhi . He was a Indian lawyer … Later in 1893, Gandhi went to South Africa to work and found that there was a lot of prejudice towards Indians. That was the reason Gandhi began protesting and eventually he became an inspiring hero for millions. The three main qualities that define Gandhi as a hero are his strong leadership, simplicity and bravery. MOVEMENT’S LED BY MAHATMA GANDHI JI 1. Champaran movement = Occurred in the year of 1917,It was the first satyagraha movement occurred in Bihar . 2.Kheda Movement= Kheda Movement of 1918 was a major revolt in the Indian independence movement. The movement was started in the Kheda district of Gujarat by the Mahatma Gandhi during the period of the British Raj. People of Kheda were unable to pay the high taxes levied by the British due to crop failure and a plague epidemic. 3. Khilafat Movement=The Khilafat Movement of 1919 is also known as the Indian Muslim movement (1919–24).

The Ottoman Empire, having sided with the Central Powers during World War I, suffered a major military defeat. 4.Non-cooperation Movement=The Non-cooperation movement was launched on 1 August 1920 by Mahatma Gandhi. Following the Rowlatt Act of 17 March 1919, and the Jallianwala Bagh massacre of 13 April 1919, Indian National Congress withdrew its support for British reforms. 5. Salt Satyagraha Movement – Dandi march=The Salt March, also known as the Salt Satyagraha, Dandi Satyagraha began with Dandi march in the year 1930 6. Quit India Movement=The Quit India Movement or the August Movement was launched at the Bombay session of the All-India Congress Committee by Mahatma Gandhi on 8 August 1942, during World War II, demanding an end to British Rule of India Now Gandhi pushed even harder for home rule, encouraging boycotts of British goods and organizing mass protests. In 1930, he began a massive satyagraha campaign against a British law that forced Indians to purchase British salt instead of producing it locally. Gandhi organized a 241-mile-long protest march to the west coast of Gujarat, where he and his acolytes harvested salt on the shores of the Arabian Sea. In response, Britain imprisoned over 60,000 peaceful protesters and inadvertently generated even more support for home rule. By then, Gandhi had become a national icon, and was widely referred to as Mahatma, Sanskrit for great soul or saint. Imprisoned for a year because of the Salt March, he became more influential than ever. He protested discrimination against the “untouchables,” India’s lowest caste, and negotiated unsuccessfully for Indian home rule. Undeterred, he began the Quit India movement, a campaign to get Britain to voluntarily withdraw from India during World War II. Britain refused and arrested him yet again.

Huge demonstrations ensued, and despite the arrests of 100,000 home rule advocates by British authorities, the balance finally tipped toward Indian independence. A frail Gandhi was released from prison in 1944, and Britain at last began to make plans to withdraw from the Indian subcontinent. It was bittersweet for Gandhi, who opposed the partition of India and attempted to quell Hindu-Muslim animosity and deadly riots in 1947. India finally gained its independence in August 1947. But Gandhi only saw it for a few months; a Hindu extremist assassinated him on January 30, 1948. Over 1.5 million people marched in his massive funeral procession. “Nonviolence is not a garment to be put on and off at will. Its seat is in the heart, and it must be an inseparable part of our being.” ~ Mahatma Gandhi THANKYOU ” JAYSWAMINARAYAN”

 

G Sushanth Naga Sai

RANK 12, AB7379

 

Mahatma Gandhiji Mahatma Gandhi summed up his philosophy of life with the words, “My life is my message”. His multifarious and dynamic personality was based on truth and nothing but the truth. Nonviolence was another intrinsic element of his philosophy. Mahatma Gandhi believed that core of every religion was truth (Satya), nonviolence(ahimsa) and the golden rule. Despite his belief in Hinduism, Gandhi was also critical of many of the social practices and sought to reform the religion. Truth, non-violence, service and swaraj are the four pillars on which Gandhi built his political edifice. Mahatma Gandhiji, was a great patriotic Indian, if not the greatest. He was a man of an unbelievably great personality. He certainly does not need any one like me praising him. Furthermore, his efforts for Indian independence are unparalleled. Most noteworthy, there would have been a significant delay in independence without him. Consequently, the British because of his pressure left India in 1947. His role in social and political reform was instrumental. Above all, he rid the society of these social evils. He is none other than a superhero for us with great preaching and stored knowledge. The full name of Mahatma Gandhi is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. He was born in Porbandar, Gujarat in a Hindu family on October 2nd 1869.He is also called as Mahatma and Bapu Ji. When British started its rule in India, Bapu was in England for his law studies.

After completing of his law studies , he came back to India and started supporting Indians to raise their voice against British rule. He began non- violence movement as he wants to end the things in a great manner. He got offended many times yet he proceeded with his peaceful battle for the independence of India. After his arrival in India, he joined the Indian national congress as a part. Being a part of Indian national congress, he started various independence movements like non-cooperation, civil disobedience, satyagraha, Dandi march and later Quit India movement which wound up effective a day and helps India in getting an opportunity. Due to his great strategies and being a freedom fighter, he got arrested many times and sent to jail. But, his dedication and high spirit help him to continue his battle of justice. Called as a father of the nation, he put all his efforts to make India free of British rule and live an independent country. He made a unity of people of all castes, religions, race, community, age or gender to step forward for the independence movement which he used all through the period. All his dedication finally forced Britishers to quit India and go back to their country on 15th August 1947, which we all celebrate every year as India Independence day. Sadly he could not continue his life after independence as he was killed by Nathuram Godsey on 30th January 1948. The most life changing lessons to learn from Mahatma Gandhi are Change yourself first. Strength through peace. Violence is unnecessary. Pursue the truth. Watch your thoughts. Jai Hindi AB7379 G Sushanth Naga Sai Class 7 pool A

 

Saketa Rama Reddy Srigiri

RANK 13, AC3479

 

Mahatma Gandhi – The Leader who Led India to Independence By Saketa Rama Reddy Srigiri AC3479 Mahatma Gandhi, the father of our nation, was a great leader who fought to achieve freedom from the British. The reason for his immense following in the entire nation is just not the greatness in his preaching, but his sincerity and keenness in following his own ideals. His simplicity in dressing and life style reflects his dispassion for the worldly possessions. He read the scriptures like Bhagwat Gita and Ramayana. This helped him understand the importance of ‘performing one’s duty’. He applied the same principle in his life. The greatness of Gandhiji did not manifest in one day. It came from constant introspection, finding own weaknesses and a desire to correct them. He treaded the path of Ahimsa, non-violence and ‘Satya’, speaking and seeking the truth. A simple being, born on 2nd October, 1869 at Porbandur in Gujarat, evolved into one of the greatest leaders of the world. He inspired lakhs of Indians to join the freedom movement. He was the source of inspiration to Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and many such people who fought against injustice. After schooling in his hometown, he studied law in England. Later on, he practiced his profession in South Africa. During his 25 years of stay there, he was moved by sorrows caused by racial discrimination against the so-called ‘coloured’ people. He was a victim himself. This led to the non- cooperation movement of the Indians and other people of Asiatic Origin. He was arrested along with his wife.

He returned to India in 1914, soon after which he joined the freedom movement. Shri Gopala Krishna Gokhale was Gandhiji’s guru; he had great faith in virtues of Gandhiji. He carried out many Satyagraha movements. In 1916, at Champaran, he fought for the rights of farmers, who were struggling because of the cruel plantation system. In 1917, at Kheda, farmers were unable to pay taxes due to crop failure. British did not pay any attention to farmers’ problems, but pressurized them to pay taxes. Gandhiji’s Satyagraha reflected the plight of those farmers. The struggles of cotton mill workers became the reason for his Ahmedabad Satyagraha, organized in 1918. Three of his Satyagrahas were recalled because they turned violent – Satyagraha to protest the Roulett Act, Non-coopeation movement, Dandi March and Civil disobedience, all started in various years, resulted in unintentional blood bath. He was moved by the atrocities of British, especially, in Jallianwalla bagh, Punjab, where hundreds of innocent people were attacked and brutally shot.

Gandhiji could not tolerate any kind of violence, even if it is violence caused to British or its supporters. He was compassionate about every human being, irrespective of colour, caste, status or nationality. He did not tolerate any injustice, either. The Purna Swaraj Pact proposed by Pandit Jawahar in 1930, was supported by Gandhiji. This has made the freedom movement very strong. The Quit India movement of 1942, spread all over the country and ultimately forced the British to step down. They left our country on 15 August, 1947, and we were freed from their brutal rule. Bapu, as Gandhiji is fondly called, also fought for social justice and equality. He was against untouchability and thought that all humans are children of God. He promoted Khadi, a handicraft product. He revived the cottage industry by weaving cotton himself. We all fondly recollect his picture, weaving cotton on his ‘Charka’. He wanted to empower rural India by proposing ‘Panchayat Raj’ system. He worked to bring in lot of social reforms. Bapuji used to walk on foot, avoiding use of carts and vehicles. He travelled only in general compartment in trains. He was jailed several times and spent months together in prison. He was never afraid of difficultiesa. The Sabarmati Ashram in Gujarat depicts his life in a wonderful way. It is a famous tourist place. Also, his Samadhi, at Raj Ghat, New Delhi, is visited by thousands of people every day. We celebrate his birthday 2nd October, every year, as Gandhi Jayanti. As a nation, we always remember him and his sacrifices.

 

Chanukya Ram

RANK 14, AC7649

 

Mahatma Gandhi was the biggest and great patriotic in India. He was a man who is had a great personality, and I am sure he certainly doesn’t need anyone like me appreciating and praising him. Apart from this, his efforts and struggle for Indian freedom are unparalleled, and we can say without him, we may not get independence. He inspired many people with freedom movements and civil rights all over the world. Early life: Mahatma Gandhi opened his eyes to this beautiful world on 2 October 1869. He was born in the Indian Gujarati family, and his father’s name was Karamchand Gandhi. However, the real name of Gandhi Ji was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, who has added the name mahatma due to their work. He completed his law training at the inner temple in London and went to South Africa.

He spent some part of his life here. Life-changing events: When Mahatma Gandhi returned to South Africa again, he had to face with racial discrimination because of his skin color. Once during travel on a stagecoach with the Europeans, he was asked to sit on the floor near the driver due to black skin. Mahatma Gandhi refused it and came forward, and because of his refusal, he had to suffer and face a beating. Other incidents also have at Pietermaritzburg in South Africa. At this time, Gandhi was made to quit train forcefully, and this incident occurs because he refuses to quit and leave the first class. As a result, he spent the whole night in the railway station and shivering the entire night. If we talk about the incident, then he faced so many events like equal rights and many other events. After these events, Mahatma Gandhi started to question and fight against the British Empire with some Indians. Struggle for independence: From South Africa, Mahatma Gandhi returned to India in 1915. At this time, he was very popular, and his reputation increases so much. Therefore he was known and popular as a leading Indian nationalist. After the back to India, Gandhi became a member of the Indian national congress. In 1920, he became the leader of the Indian congress organization. As a part of the independence struggle, Gandhi launched many important movements such as kheda satyagraha, Champaran Satyagraha, non-co-operation, khilafat, civil disobedience, salt satyagraha, and quit India movement. This event was a step towards Indian freedom. Legacy of Mahatma Gandhi: As you read, Mahatma Gandhi was a great leader, so that he has influenced several international leaders across the globe.

Many leaders got so much inspiration from the struggle of Mahatma Gandhi. Some leaders are martin Luther king jr, James Lawson, and James beve. The Nelson Mandela also influenced from the freedom struggle of Gandhi Ji. Along with Lanza Del Vasto especially came to India to spend some time and live with Mahatma Gandhi. The UN has greatly honored Gandhi Ji; that’s why they announced that they celebrate 2 October as an international day of nonviolence. Mahatma Gandhi received so many awards as the greatest political icon, father of the nation, and many more. These speeches will be useful for students, teachers, and followers of Gandhiji addressing people on Gandhi Jayanti, or for people promoting ideas of Ghandhiji and non-violence, or by the government or NGOs working on Ghandhiji’s ideology promotion. . the two weapon’s of gandhiji are:-truth & peace let’s follow him jai hind

 

Rohan Ramesh Dubaria

RANK 15, AD3848

 

Mahatma Gandhi was born on 2nd October 1969.His Birth Place is Porbandar,Gujarat. His full name is Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi. He was one of the founder of Modern India. Mahatma Gandhi was a great patriotic Indian, if not the greatest. He was a man of an unbelievably great personality. He certainly does not need anyone like me praising him. Furthermore, his efforts for Indian independence are unparalleled. Most noteworthy, there would have been a significant delay in independence without him. Consequently, the British because of his pressure left India in 1947. In this essay on Mahatma Gandhi, we will see his contribution and legacy First of all, Mahatma Gandhi was a notable public figure. His role in social and political reform was instrumental. Above all, he rid the society of these social evils. Hence, many oppressed people felt great relief because of his efforts. Gandhi became a famous international figure because of these efforts. Furthermore, he became the topic of discussion in many international media outlets. Mahatma Gandhi made significant contributions to environmental sustainability. Most noteworthy, he said that each person should consume according to his needs.

The main question that he raised was “How much should a person consume?”. Gandhi certainly put forward this question. Furthermore, this model of sustainability by Gandhi holds huge relevance in current India. This is because currently, India has a very high population. There has been the promotion of renewable energy and small-scale irrigation systems. This was due to Gandhiji’s campaigns against excessive industrial development. Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence is probably his most important contribution. This philosophy of non-violence is known as Ahimsa. Most noteworthy, Gandhiji’s aim was to seek independence without violence. He decided to quit the Non-cooperation movement after the Chauri-Chaura incident. This was due to the violence at the Chauri Chaura incident. Consequently, many became upset at this decision. However, Gandhi was relentless in his philosophy of Ahimsa. Secularism is yet another contribution of Gandhi. His belief was that no religion should have a monopoly on the truth.

Mahatma Gandhi certainly encouraged friendship between different religions Mahatma Gandhi has influenced many international leaders around the world. His struggle certainly became an inspiration for leaders. Such leaders are Martin Luther King Jr., James Beve, and James Lawson. Furthermore, Gandhi influenced Nelson Mandela for his freedom struggle. Also, Lanza del Vasto came to India to live with Gandhi. The United Nations has greatly honored Mahatma Gandhi. UN has made 2nd October as “the International Day of Nonviolence.” Furthermore, many countries observe 30th January as School Day of Nonviolence and Peace. The awards given to Mahatma Gandhi are too many to discuss. Probably only a few nations remain which have not awarded Mahatma Gandhi. In conclusion, Mahatma Gandhi was one of the greatest political icons ever. Most noteworthy, Indians revere by describing him as the “father of the nation”. His name will certainly remain immortal for all generations.

29 thoughts on “Essay on Mahatma Gandhi

  1. Essay on Mahatma Gandhi – Mahatma Gandhi was a great patriotic Indian, if not the greatest. He was a man of an unbelievably great personality. He certainly does not need anyone like me praising him. Furthermore, his efforts for Indian independence are unparalleled. Most noteworthy, there would have been a significant delay in independence without him. Consequently, the British because of his pressure left India in 1947. In this essay on Mahatma Gandhi, we will see his contribution and legacy.

    Essay on Mahatma Gandhi

    Contributions of Mahatma Gandhi
    First of all, Mahatma Gandhi was a notable public figure. His role in social and political reform was instrumental. Above all, he rid the society of these social evils. Hence, many oppressed people felt great relief because of his efforts. Gandhi became a famous international figure because of these efforts. Furthermore, he became the topic of discussion in many international media outlets.

    Mahatma Gandhi made significant contributions to environmental sustainability. Most noteworthy, he said that each person should consume according to his needs. The main question that he raised was “How much should a person consume?”. Gandhi certainly put forward this question.

    Furthermore, this model of sustainability by Gandhi holds huge relevance in current India. This is because currently, India has a very high population. There has been the promotion of renewable energy and small-scale irrigation systems. This was due to Gandhiji’s campaigns against excessive industrial development.

    Mahatma Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence is probably his most important contribution. This philosophy of non-violence is known as Ahimsa. Most noteworthy, Gandhiji’s aim was to seek independence without violence. He decided to quit the Non-cooperation movement after the Chauri-Chaura incident. This was due to the violence at the Chauri Chaura incident. Consequently, many became upset at this decision. However, Gandhi was relentless in his philosophy of Ahimsa.

    Secularism is yet another contribution of Gandhi. His belief was that no religion should have a monopoly on the truth. Mahatma Gandhi certainly encouraged friendship between different religions.

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    Legacy of Mahatma Gandhi
    Mahatma Gandhi has influenced many international leaders around the world. His struggle certainly became an inspiration for leaders. Such leaders are Martin Luther King Jr., James Beve, and James Lawson. Furthermore, Gandhi influenced Nelson Mandela for his freedom struggle. Also, Lanza del Vasto came to India to live with Gandhi.

    The United Nations has greatly honored Mahatma Gandhi. UN has made 2nd October as “the International Day of Nonviolence.” Furthermore, many countries observe 30th January as School Day of Nonviolence and Peace.

    The awards given to Mahatma Gandhi are too many to discuss. Probably only a few nations remain which have not awarded Mahatma Gandhi.

    In conclusion, Mahatma Gandhi was one of the greatest political icons ever. Most noteworthy, Indians revere by describing him as the “father of the nation”. His name will certainly remain immortal for all generations.

    Essay Topics on Famous Leaders
    Mahatma Gandhi
    APJ Abdul Kalam
    Jawaharlal Nehru
    Swami Vivekananda
    Mother Teresa
    Rabindranath Tagore
    Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel
    Subhash Chandra Bose
    Abraham Lincoln
    Martin Luther King
    FAQs on Mahatma Gandhi
    Q.1 Why Mahatma Gandhi decided to stop Non-cooperation movement?

    A.1 Mahatma Gandhi decided to stop the Non-cooperation movement. This was due to the infamous Chauri-Chaura incident. There was significant violence at this incident. Furthermore, Gandhiji was strictly against any kind of violence.

    Q.2 Name any two leaders influenced by Mahatma Gandhi?

    A.2 Two leaders influenced by Mahatma Gandhi are Martin Luther King Jr and Nelson Mandela.

  2. Jay Swamynarayan.

    I am Master Veer Nair from class second.

    I study in Gurukul International School, Navi Mumbai branch.

    Please see my essay about Mahatma Gandhiji.

    Thank you.

    Jay Swaminarayan.

  3. Jai Swaminarayan,
    I am Master Nikhil Singh
    I Study in Shree Swaminarayan Gurukul International School,Hyderabad branch,
    Please see my essay Mahatma Ghandhi

  4. Nice thoughts and writing skills of all participants. I like all these essays above and everyone is the best one.
    I am sure the judge must be faced with difficulties to give the ranking to these participants.

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